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1884-5. 



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For the Year 1884-5, 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



Forms of Bequests. 



Persons desiring to make bequests to the Theological Seminary 
or the College are advised to make use of the following forms. 
The laws of different States vary on the subject, and it is expedi- 
ent for those who desire to make valid bequests to the Institutions 
to consult and conform to the laws of the State in which they 
live: 

I give and bequeath to the Theological Seminary 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church, in the Diocese 
of Ohio, at Gambier, Ohio, the sum of . . . .dollars. 

I give and bequeath to the Theological Seminary 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church, in the Diocese 
of Ohio, at Gambier, Ohio, for the use of Kenyon 
College, the sum of. . . .dollars. 



Note.— By an Act of the Legislature of the State of Ohio, passed March 30th, 
1874, all bequests for Benevolent, Religious, Educational or Charitable purposes 
are invalid and void, unless made by a will duly executed according to law, at 
least twelve months prior to decease of the testator or testatrix. 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



i tu*Ut8. 



Rt. Rev. GREGORY T. BEDELL, D. D., President, ex-officio. 

Rt. Rev. THOMAS A. JAGGAR, D. D., ex-officio. 

Rev. WM. B. BODINE, D. D., ex-officio. 



PERMANENT BOARD. 
Under Constitution Article III. 

Rev. Ebastus Burr, D. D., Portsmouth. 

Hon. Morrison R. Waite, LL. D., Toledo. 

Rev. N. S. Rulison, D. D., Cleveland. 

Mr. A. H. Moss Sandusky. 

Rev. I. Newton Stanger, D. D., Cincinnati. 

Hon. Rufus King, LL. D., . Cincinnati. 

Rev. E. R. Atwill, D. D., Toledo. 

Hon. M. M. Granger, LL. D., Zanesville. 

ELECTED BY THE CONVENTIONS OF THE DIOCESES OF OHIO AND 
SOUTHERN OHIO. 

Under Constitution Article VI. 

William J. Boardman, Esq., Cleveland. 

Rev. A. F. Blake, . . Cincinnati. 

Mr. E. M. Wood, . . ■ *. . . Dayton. 

Rev. Y. Peyton Morgan, Cleveland. 

Hon. Columbus Delano, LL. D., Mount Vernon. 

Rev. Dudley W. Rhodes, Cincinnati. 

ELECTED BY THE ALUMNI. 

Rev. Henry L. Badger, Portsmouth. 

Charles E. Burr, Esq., Columbus. 

Rev. Albert B. Putnam, Gambier. 

Mr. Albert L. Hayden, Chicago. 

ELECTED BY THE CONVENTIONS OF THE DIOCESES OF PITTSBURGH, 
WEST VIRGINIA, KENTUCKY, INDIANA AND MICHIGAN. 

Rev. John H. Burton,) m ^ p f puNhnnrh 
Mr. John B. Jackson, j Dl0ce * e ot ^ittsburgn. 

MrTcrugerw'Sith, I Dioccse of We£t Vi ^ inia - 

Hon. T W EK Ste™son; LL. D., i Diocese of Kentucky. 

Rev. Joseph S. Jeucks, LL. D.J ^. . T .. 

Dr. John S. Irwin, ' j Diocese of Indiana. 

Rev. Royal B, Balcom, { tw~„„„.„ ~t *r- u- 

Col. James T. Sterling,! Dl °cese of Michigan. 

T. R. HEAD, Agent. 
H. N. HILLS, Treasurer. 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



Qfifctp 4 h$tmttim w$ ^mnm$ni 



Right Rev. GREGORY T. BEDELL, D. D., 
President, ex-officio, of the Theological Seminary. 

Rev. WILLIAM B. BODINE, D. D., 

President of Kenyon College, 

Dean of the Theological Seminary. 

LAWRENCE RUST, M. A., 

Dean of Kenyon College, 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

Rev. EDWARD C. BENSON, A. M., 
Professor^of the Latin Language and Literature. 

THEODORE STERLING, M. D., LL. D., 
Bowler Professor of Natural Philosophy and Chemistry. 

ELI T. TAPPAN, LL. D., 

Professor of Political Science, 

Instructor in Logic. 

Rev. FLEMING JAMES, D. D., 

Bedell Professo r of New Testament Instruction and Pastoral The- 
ology. 

Rev. CYRUS S. BATES, D. D., 

Milnor and Lewis Professor of Systematic Divinity, Christian Evi- 
dences, and Canon Law. 



GAMBIRR CATALOGUE, 




k 



0I jm$(cuct£« w\i fp«Mt 



WILLIAM T. COLV1LLE, A. M., 

Professor of Modern Languages. 

GEORGE C. S. SOUTH WORTH, A. M., 

Mcllvaine Professor of English Literature and History. 

RUSSELL S. DEVOL, A. M., 

Peabody Professor of Mathematics, Civil Engineering, and Astron- 
omy. 

Rev. HOSEA W. JONES, D. D., 
Eleutherps Cooke Professor of Ecclesiastical History. 

II. N. HILLS, A. B., 
Rector of Kenyon Grammar School. 

ERNEST STANLEY COOK, A. B., 

A. L. HERRLINGER, A. B., Ph. B., 

WM. McK. VANCE, A. B., 

IRVING TODD, Ph. B., 

ARTHUR S. DUDLEY, 

Assistants, Kenyon Grammar School. 

Rev. EDWARD C. BENSON, A. M., 
Librarian of Kenyon College. 

Rev. FLEMING JAMES, D. D., 

Librarian of the Theological Seminary, 

Warden of Bexley Hall. 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



" The Bishops of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Unit- 
ed States of America, shall, individually, and any two or more of 
them, be visitants of the Seminary." 

According to this proviso of the Constitution, the following 
have accepted the trust: 

The Bishop of Western New York. 
The Bishop of Pittsburgh. 
The Assistant Bishop of Kentucky. 
The Bishop of West Virginia. 
The Bishop of Michigan. 



Committees to Visit Institutions at Gambier. 



Rev. Y. P. Morgan. Mr, A. J. Williams. 

Rev. S. T. Street. Mr. A. H. Pierson. 

Rev. J. M. Piettinger. Mr. J. L. Stettinius. 

Mr. Albert Douglas, Jr. 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE 



BY THE FACULTY OF KEN YON COLLEGE, AT 
THE COMMENCEMENT, JUNE 26, 1884. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS, IN COURSE. 



George Elliott Benedict, 
Richard Bury Bloodgood, 
Francis Thomas Anderson Junkin, 



Cincinnati. 

Wyandotte, Mich. 

Charleston, S. C. 



BACHELOR of philosophy, in course. 



Joshua Hurbert Douglas, 
J. Edward Good, 
Samuel W. Taylor, 
Irving Todd, 
Charles Wardlow, 



Chillicothe. 

Akron. 

Springfield. 

. Manhattan, Kansas. 

Middletown. 



master of arts, in course. 



Rev. Louis DeCormis, 
Rev. Fred M. Gray, 
Thomas A. MacBride, M. D., 
William F. Webb, 
Rev. John G. Black, . 



Lynn, Mass. 

Holderness, N. H. 

New York. 

Cincinnati. 

Bellaire. 



BY THE FACULTY OF THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 

doctor in divinity, honorary. 



Rev. I. Newton Stanger, 
Rev. Hosea W. Jones, 
Rev. William M. Pettis, 



Cincinnati. 

. Piqua. 

Lafayette, Ind. 



IO 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE, 




Right Rev. GREGORY T. BEDELL, D. D., 

President, ex-officio. 



Rev. WILLIAM B. BODINE, D. D. 
Dean, 

Instructor in Homiletics. 



Rev. FLEMING JAMES, D. D., 

Bedell Professor of New Testament Instruction and Pastoral The- 
ology. 



Rev. CYRUS S. BATES, D. D, 

Milnor and Lewis Professor of Systematic Divinity, Christian Evi- 
dences, and Canon Law. 



Rev. HOSEA W. JONES, D. D., 

Eleutheros Cooke Professor of Ecclesiastical History, Liturgies, 
and Church Polity. 



GAMBIKR CATALOGUE. 



I I 



'($ IE 

, t. 



mm 5to 



Kolla Dyer, A. B., 

Arthur Bascom Howard, Ph. 13., 

Douglas Irvine Horrs, 



Southern Ohio, 

Southern Ohio. 

Kentucky. 



12 GAMRIER CATALOGUE. 



. 



mt$t g&tuitQ 



Rev. WILLIAM B. BODINE, I). I)., 

President. 

Instructor in Biblical History and Christian Evidences. 

LAWRENCE RUST, M. A., 

Dean. 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

Rev. EDWARD C. BENSON, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

THEODORE STERLING, M. D., LL. D., 

Bowler Professor of Natural Philosophy and Chemistry. 

ELI T. TAPPAN, LL. D., 

Professor of Political Science, 
Instructor in Logic. 

Rev. CYRUS S. BATES, D. D., 
Spencer and Wolfe Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

WILLIAM T. COLVILLE, A. M., 

Professor of Modern Languages. 

GEORGE C. S. SO CTII WORTH, A. M., 
Mcllvaine Professor of English Literature and History. 

RUSSELL S. DEVOL, A. M., 

Peabody Professor of Mathematics, Civil Engineering, and Astron- 
omy. 



GAM1UER CATALOGUE. 



lAvcr 



tal 



mm 



SENIOR CLASS. 

NAME. 

*Alva Henry Anderson, 

^Clifford Lincoln Sherman Ayres, 

Ernest Milnor Benedict, 

Edward Vance Bope, 

John Adolph Fritscii, 

Orion Boyd Harris, 

George Clarence Hollow ay, 

Charles Edward Milmine, 

*Roger Hanson Peters, 

JonN Franklin Smith, 

Alonzo Mitchell Snyder, 

William Tappan, . 

George William Dorm an Webster. 



RESIDENCE. 

Shelby. 

Gambier. 

. Cincinnati. 

Findlay. 

Wapakoneta. 

Bladensburg. 

. Cincinnati. 

. Toledo. 

Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

Fremont. 

Galion. 

Steubenville. 

Geneva. 



*ifoi in 



H 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Marcus Frederic Bates, 
Henry Edward Chase, 
Hugh Barrett Clement, 
George Clarke Cox, 
Arthur Stanhope Dudley, . 
William Ellsworth Grant, 
*Charles Trobasco Harnwell, 
*Martin Armstrong Mayo, 
*Harry Lardner Sterrett, . 



residence. 



Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Chicago, 111. 

Kenton . 

Cincinnati. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mt. Vernon. 

Gambier. 

Lima. 

. Cincinnati. 



''Not in full standi ii (j. 



GAMMER CATALOGUE. 



!S 



WtibttQXtibu&i&B* 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

NAME. 

Cleveland KEiTn Benedict, 
Madison Harlan Bowman, 
Kenyon Bronson Conger, . 
*Curtts Clay poole, 
William Herbert Dewart, 
Edward McMullan Eullington, . 
Alfred IIoyt Granger, . 
Robert Mathew Greer, 
Lawrence Perus Hancock, 
Ralph Sheldon IIolbrook, 
* William Walter Lanthurn, 
George Arthur Reid, . 
Walter Wright Scranton, 
HuGn Sterling, .... 
John Ayers Strutton, 
William White, .... 
Charles Huntington Young, 
James Henry Young. 



RESIDENCE. 

Cincinnati. 

. Irvine, Ky. 

. Akron. 

. Columbus. 

Owattonna, Minn. 

Irwin. 

Zanesville. 

Mt. Vernon. 

Franklin, Pa. 

Toledo. 

. Dayton. 

Geneva. 

Wellington. 

Gambier. 

Norwalk. 

Cynthiana, Ky. 

Gambier. 

Gambier. 



*Not in full standing. 



i6 



GAMBIER CATALOCIK. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

NAME. 

Willis Swanner Anderson, . 
FrAnk IIerschel Briggs, . 
Harry Currington Daly, 
Henry Curtis Devin, 
Walstein Failing Douthirt, 
George Fiske Dudley, 
Guy Despard Goff. 
Albert IIalstead, . . 

John Edward Jewett, . 
Samuel Percival Jodinson, 
Charles Fremont McCann, . 
William Moerlein, 
Oscar Wirt Newman, . 
Charles Steinfort Pearson, 
George Henry Prince, 
Bernard Van Horne Schultz, 
John David Skilton, . 
Henry Bedinger Swearingen, . 
CnARLES Avery Tappan, 
JonN Frederic Trimble, . 
Robert Chochung Woo, 
Foints Siching Yen, 



RESIDENCE. 

Shelby. 
Painesville. 

, Belle Vernon, Pa. 

Mt. Vernon. 

Delaware. 

Washington, D. C. 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Cincinnati. 

Elyria. 

Mt. Vernon. 

. Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Portsmouth. 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

Gambier. 

Zanesviile. 

. Monroeville. 

Circleville. 

Steubenville. 

. Clinton, Iowa. 

Shanghai, China. 

Shanghai, China. 



(xAMI)IEK CATALOGUE. 



wgraftttate 



z$4 



UNCLASSIFIED. 

NAME. 

Addison Clarence Dickinson, 
John Grant Swearingen, . 
Eber TnERAN Fuller, . 
Albert Condon Wiiittaker, 
Charles William Wiiitney, Jr., 



RESIDENCE. 

Cincinnati. 

Circleville. 

Dublin. 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

New York, N. Y. 



i8 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



Wmit 



1884-1885. 



Charles Henry Arndt, 
Henry Edward Adams, 
Albert Harlan Bates, . 
Carl Julius Baer, 
Harry Byron Banning, 
Kirby Banning, 
Eli Biggs, 
Arthur S. Boyer, 
William Budd Bodine, Jr., 
Isaac Curtis Brewer, Jr., 
J. Prossor Burckhardt, . 
Stephen Henry Burton, 
Alfred Buttles, . 
Henry Wright Buttles, 
Theodore Cook, Jr., 
Charles H. Childs, 
Charles M. Finch, Jr., 
Joseph Walker Gallaher, . 
Clarence Matthew Henning, 
Willis Chase Hildreth, 
Charles Otis Hill,. 
Norman S. Horton, 
James Killduff, 
Thomas P. Kirby, 
David Kronacher, 
William Frederick Krueger, 
William Wallace Lowrey, Jr. 
Edward TnoMAS Mabley, 
Charles Kachlar Morrell, 



Sandusky. 
Gambier. 
Gambier. 
Gallipolis. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Gambier. 
Dayton. 
Gambier. 
Sandusky. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Gambier. 
Gambier. 
Cincinnati. 
Wooster. 
Columbus. 
Moundsville, A\^. Va. 
Evansville, Ind. 
. Wheeling, W. Va. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 
Pomeroy. 
Gambier. 
Muncie, Ind. 
Cincinnati. 
. Cincinnati. 
New Albany, Ind. 
Akron. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



T 9 



fcuym %mmnmt Bti^mi 



1884-1885. 



Harry Murphy, . 

Charles Willard Henking Needham, 

James Noble, 

William B. Phillips, . 

Alfred Harrod Prince, 

Frederick William Prince, . 

William Edward Rambo, 

James Pardee Reed, 

George Lee Rust, . 

Frederick F. Sanford, 

Robert Sterling, 

Carl Donner Stone, 

Leon Enoch Stricker, 

Joseph Peppino Surdo, 

th03ias townsley swearingen, 

Mark Alfred Thomas, 

Robert John Trimble, 

George Urquhart, ■ . 

John Miler Urquhart, 

James Percival Walker, 

LeRoi Pollock Wadleigh, 

Ye ATM an Wardlott, 

William Edmund Wilson, 

Albert Wise, .... 

George Woods, 

Herbert James Wrigley, 

George Dudley Young, . 

Lee Huntington Young, 



Indianapolis, Ind. 

. Gallipolis. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Green Valley. 

Gambier. 

Gambier. 

. Logan. 

Marion. 

. Leesburg, Va. 

. Cleveland. 

Gambier. 

Chicago, Ills. 

Tiffin. 

Cincinnati. 

Circleville. 

Middletown. 

Covington, Ky. 

Greenville, Miss. 

Greenville, Miss. 

Gambier. 

. Clinton, Iowa. 

Middletown. 

Middletown. 

Lima. 

Newark. 

Oakfield, N. Y. 

Gambier. 

Gambier. 



20 GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



gfcwi of 1870. 
CHARLES CLEMENT FISHER. 
JOHN CHARLES DUNN. 

^Caas of 1877. 
HENRY DEANE PAGE. 

gCcuM of 187S. 
WILLIAM THOMAS WRIGHT. 

g&M» of 18S0. 
GROVE DANIEL CURTIS. 
CHARLES DAVID WILLIAMS. 

g&u* of 1882. 
ERNEST STANLEY COOK. 
REUBEN BROADDUS MILLER. 

§W of 1883. 
ANDREW L. HERRLINGER. 
WILLIAM A. CHILD. 
THOMPSON B. WRIGHT. 

§lass of 1884. 
IRVING TODD. 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



21 



€®U*$? €&J 



£vot'c: vctin. 

1 88S- 

Jan. 7-Wednesday Term opens at 5 oclock, P. M. 

Feb. 18-Wednesday Ash Wednesday. 

April i_Wednesday Term Examinations begin. 

April 5-Sunday Easter Day. 

April 10-Friday Term opens at 5 o'clock, P. M. 

May 14-Thursday Ascension Day. 

May 20— Wednesday Kenyon Day. 

June 21-Sundav Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 23-Tuesday Examinations for Admission. 

June 24-Wednesday Meeting of Trustees. 

June 24-Wednesday Meeting of Alumni. 

June 25-Thursday Commencement. 

Sept. 8— Tuesday Examinations for Admission. 

Sept. 9— Wednesday Term opens at 5 o'clock, P. M. 

NoY . i—All Saints" Day, . . . Founders' Day. 

DeCi i6_Wednesday Term Examinations begin. 

£a>t"ct Wp&wi. 

1886. 

Jan. 6 -Wednesday Term opens at 5 o'clock, P. M. 

Feb. 22— Monday Washington's Birthday. 

March 10-Wednesday Ash Wednesday. 

March 31-Wednesday Term Examinations begin. 

April G— Tuesday Term opens at 5 o.cleck P. M. 

April 23-Friday Good Friday. 

April 25— Sunday Easter Day. 

May 19— Wednesday Kenyon Day. 

June ^-Thursday Ascension Day. 

June 20-Sunday, Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 22— Tuesday Examinations for Admission. 

June 23-Wednesday Meeting of Trustees. 

June 23— Wednesday Meeting of Alumni. 

June 24— Thursday Commencement. 



22 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE, 



PiSfeMg 






FROM ITS FOUNDATION. 



1830 . . No honors assigned. 

1831 . . . No honors assigned. 

1832 . . No honors assigned. 

1833 . . Sherlock A. Bronson. 

1834 . . No honors assigned. 

1835 .... William Hodges. 

1836 .... PeterS. Kuth. 
1837 John Ufford. 

1838 . . Henry L. Richards. 

1839 .... John W. Marsh. 

1840 . . . Edward W. Slye. 

1841 .... Edwin B. Hale. 

1842 . . Rutherford B. Hayes. 

1843 . . . George Thompson. 

1844 . . . Benjamin L. Lang. 

1845 .... Jacob A. Camp. 

1846 . . Andrew D. Benedict. 

1847 . . Solomon N. Sanford. 

1848 . Columbus S. Doolittle. 

1849 . . . Edward C. Benson. 

1850 . . . Moses M. Granger. 

1851 . Etherington T. Spangler. 

1852 . . . Henry H. Morrell. 

1853 . . . Henry D. Lathrop. 

1854 . . . Moses Hamilton. 

1855 .... James M. LeDuc. 

1856 . . George T. Chapman. 

1857 . . . John W. McCarty. 



1858 . . . Frederick M. Gray. 

1859 . . . Charles H. Young. 

1860 .... Joseph Packard. 

1861 . . William W. Lathrop. 

1862 . Alexander V. G. Allen. 

1863 . . . Edwin L. Stanton. 

1864 .... William Hyde. 

1865 .... George Coburn. 

1866 . . . John P. Hollway. 

1867 .... John H. Burton. 

1868 .... John B. Leavitt. 

1869 . . . Charles D. Leggett. 

1870 .... George W. Cass. 

1871 . . William M. Harrison. 

1872 . . . William II. Strong. 

1873 . . . Lewis W. Burton. 

1874 . . William T. Colville. 

1875 . . . Robert M. O'Ferrall. 

1876 . . . Charles C. Fisher. 

1877 .... Henry D. Page. 

1878 . . William T. Wright. 

1879 . . . No honors assigned. 

1880 . . . Grove D. Curtis. 

1881 . . . No honors assigned. 

1882 .... Ernest S. Cook. 

1883 . . Andrew L. Herrlinger. 
1884 Irving Todd. 



GAMBIRR CATALOGUE. 23 



d 



lt«4j$ t\ ^Inwtp j^ 



Rev. E. C. BENSON, 

President. 

Rev. C. S. BATES, D. D., 

D. B. KIRK, Esq., 

S. W. PROBASCO, Esq., 

Vice Presidents. 

FRANK W. BLAKE, M. D., 

Treasurer. 

j. d. h. Mckinley, 

Secretary. 



Board of Overseers. 

R. B. HAYES. JOHN G. MITCHELL. 

M. M. GRANGER. 



24 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



Theological Students, 

Seniors, 

Juniors, 

Sophomores, 

Freshmen, 

Unclassified, 

Kenyon Grammar School. 

Ilarcourt Place School, 



Total . ' 164 



3 
13 

9 
18 
22 

5 



GAMBIKR CATALOGUE. 25 



yirilljWI! I&tfttttttta? 



%-♦ 



WILLIAM B. BODINE, D. D., 

LAWRENCE RUST, M. A., CYRUS S. BATES, D. D. 

II. N. HILLS, A. B., 

REGENTS. 



II. N. HILLS, A. B., 

Rector. 

ERNEST S. COOK, A. B., 

W. McK. VANCE, A. B., 

A. L. HERRLINGER, A. B., Pn. B., 

IRVING TODD, Ph. B., 

ARTHUR S. DUDLEY, 

Instructors. 

MRS. C. M. BARROWS, 
Housekeeper. 



2 6 GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



DESIGN. 

From the time of the foundation of Kenyon College, it has been 
necessary in connection with the College to provide efficient pre- 
paratory instruction. For this purpose Kenyon Grammar School 
was established nearly sixty years ago. While the distinctive work 
of the School is the preparation of boys for Kenyon College, those 
who desire only a good preparation for business are provided with 
courses of study in accordance with their needs. It is aimed to 
provide here a Church School, where, under influences that tend to 
the development of Christian character, boys will receive efficient 
and careful instruction and training, intellectual and moral. 

LOCATION. 

The site of the School is on an arm of the plateau upon which 
Gambier is situated. It is half a mile from the College, and a 
quarter of a mile from Bexley Hall. The grounds comprise about 
sixty acres. They afford large stretches of lawn, ample ball-grounds 
and pleasant walks, as well as all the farming, gardening, pasture 
and meadow land necessary for the School. Within a stone's 
throw of the buildings is an artificial lake of spring water. It adds 
to the beauty of the grounds and affords fine skating in winter. 
The spring has not been known to fail and it supplies an abundance 
of soft water for household use. 

BUILDINGS. 

The buildings consist of Milnor, Delano, and North Halls. The 
first two are brick; the latter, brick and frame. They front the 
south and command a wide sweep of the Kokosing valley. They 
are heated by steam, provided with bath rooms, and have the best 
system of drainage. The boys' wash room contains twenty-five 
marble bowls. The School room is 38x50 feet, with windows on 
three sides. The Dining Boom is of the same size on the floor 
below. 

DOMESTIC ARRANGEMENTS. 

The pupils live in the same building with the Rector and 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 27 

Assistant Teachers, and take their meals at the same table. There 
is a teacher in charge of each floor of the building. Pupils are 
thus brought under the personal influence of the teachers. 

Pupils are provided with rooms ; two pupils occupying one 
room. Each pupil is provided with a single bed. The school par- 
lors are always open to the pupils and with no other restraints than 
are common in well ordered families. A large Reading Room, 
about fifty feet long, has lately been fitted up, and is open to the 
boys at all times. It contains a good library of boys' books, also 
papers and periodicals. 

STUDIES. 

Pupils who satisfactorily complete the regular course of study 
in the School, are admitted to the College without examination. 

While pupils may elect to take either the regular course, or a 
business course, the particular work to be done is assigned and is 
not a matter of choice. A business course includes the ordinary 
English branches, together with book-keeping. 

Pupils are not allowed to change from one course of study to 
another, except at the beginning of a term. 

The School is divided into four Forms, or Classes. The follow- 
ing is the course of study leading to admission to Kenyon College : 

FIRST FORM. 

Arithmetic, .... Greenleaf s Practical. 

English Grammar, ...... Harvey. 

History of the United States, . . . . Ridpath. 

Geography, .... Guyot's Common School. 

Reading, Spelling, Penmanship, Letter-writing. 

SECOND FORM. 

Arithmetic, ..... GreenleaFs ^National. 

English Grammar, ...... Harvey. 

History of England., ..... Lancaster. 

T .. ( Allen and Greenouglrs Grammar. 

-^ aLin ' • • • 1 Jones' First Lessons. 

Geography, Reading, Spelling, Penmanship, Letter-writing. 

TniRD FORM. 

Algebra, . . . Wentworttfs through Quadratics. 

English Grammar, ..... Chittenden. 
Latin, . . . Csesar's Commentaries, four books. 

Greek,* . . Goodwin's Grammar, White's Lessons. 

German,* . . Wliitney's Grammar and Reader. 

Spelling, Penmanship, Composition. 



_S GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



FOURTH FORM. 

Geometry, .... Tappan, five chapters. 

Rhetoric, ....... Hart. 

, llH , , ( Cicero, six orations. 

Jj(lU11 ' • ( Virgil's iEneid, four books. 

Natural Philosophy, .... Avery or Gage. 

r ,,. nQlr * ( Anabasis, three books. 

lxieeKl ' \ Iliad, one book. 

German* ..... Whitney's Header. 

Spelling and Composition. 

Pupils are not required to study both Greek and German. 

In order to enter the first form, a boy must have a fair 
knowledge of mental arithmetic, and must be able to read with 
ease and fluency. 

Applicants for admission to advanced classes must pass 
examinations upon the studies of the lower forms. 

Students who expect to enter Kenyon College, will find it to 
their advantage to take their preparatory training at the Grammar 
School. 

Thorough scholarship is a constant aim. Monthly reports of 
the standing of each pupil are forwarded to the parents or guardian, 
who are requested to keep themselves informed thereby of the 
progress and behavior of the pupils. 

Examinations are held at the close of each term. No pupil 
who fails to answer sixty per cent, of the questions in these exam- 
inations will be allowed to go on with his classes until he has satis- 
factorily made up his deficiencies. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

The pupils attend a daily service of morning prayer, and the 
public religious worship on Sunday at the College Church. On 
Sunday afternoons there is either a half hour's study of the Bible 
under the guidance and instruction of the Rector, or a lecture on 
some religious subject by the President of the college. 

PHYSICAL EXERCISE. 

The school is provided with a Gymnasium fitted up with a 
Bowling Alley and other appliances. The play grounds are large 
and attractive, and all manly sports are encouraged. 

MILITARY DRILL AND INSTRUCTION. 

This department is .under charge of a competent officer, by 
whom the pupils are regularly drilled. The system is subordinate 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 29 



to the higher purposes of the school as a literary institution. Its 
advantages are : (1.) It secures agreeable and healthful exercise. 
(2.) It tends to give an erect carriage and good manners. (3.) It 
promotes habits of order and obedience, important elements of 
success, both at school and in after life. 

SESSION. 

The session begins the third Wednesday in September, and 
closes the last Thursday in June. There is a vacation of three 
weeks at Christmas, and one week in the Spring. Pupils must be 
entered for the entire session, or the remainder of it if it has begun. 
Xo deduction will be made on account of withdrawal or other 
absence, except for an absence of more than four weeks, on account 
of sickness or dismissal, when five dollars a week, (estimated cost 
of board and lodging,) will be refunded for the time lost. 

SCHEDULE OF FEES. 

Tuition, Board, Washing (1^ doz.), Fuel and Lights, per annum, $350 00 
sit to cover Books and Incidentals, .... 2000 

Medical Attendance for the Session, .... 5 00—375 00 



Payable on Entrance, Cash . . . . . .20000 

February 1st, ........ 175 00—375 00 

Day Scholars, payable half yearly in advance, $75. 

Pupils who are a month late in entering will be charged at the 
rate of $40 per month for the remainder of the half year. 

To secure a room a deposit of $25 will be required. This 
deposit will be credited on account ; but should the pupil fail to 
attend, it will be forfeited. 

Books are supplied at the school at publisher's prices. The 
estimated cost of books and stationery for the session is $20 ; but 
an account of items is kept, and at the end of the session final 
settlement is made. If the account exceeds the deposit, a bill for 
excess is rendered ; and if it is less than the deposit, the balance is 
refunded. 

A charge of $8 per week is made for pupils who find it necessary 
to remain at the school during vacation. 

REQUISITES. 

Each pupil should bring with him an umbrella, a pair of over- 
shoes, blacking brush and blacking, clothes brush, a coverlet, two 
pairs of sheets and blankets for single bed, pillow cases one yard 
by five-eighths, towels, napkins, a napkin ring, and a clothes bag. 

To avoid loss each article should be distinctly marked with the 
owner s name. 



30 GAMBIER CATALOGUE, 



UNIFORM. 

A uniform, consisting of coat, pants and vest, of line dark blue 
cloth, trimmed with brass buttons and a gilt stripe, has been 
adopted for the School. The cost varies from $20 to $25, depending 
upon the size of the wearer. Ail pupils are expected to wear this 
uniform. 

rmzES. 

At the close of the school year, four gold medals of equal value 
are given by the Regents, as prizes, to the pupils who rank highest 
in the following studies: Spelling, English Composition, Latin 
and Greek. Also, a gold medal is given by Professor Flavel S. 
Luther, of Trinity College, formerly head master of the School, for 
the highest grade in Algebra. 

CONCERNING OUR CHARGES. 

The School is a department of the College, and as such pays no 
rent for the property. This enables us to make our charges much 
less than those of private institutions of a similar grade. There is 
probably no Boys' School in the West that pays so much for 
supplying first- rate instruction. 

IS THE SCHOOL A GOOD ONE. 

Neither effort nor expense have been spared to make the school 
one of the best. 

We believe the condition of school life should be as bright and 
pleasant as possible. 

We believe that boys require an abundance of good, healthy 
food, well cooked. 

We believe they ought to be conscientiously and thoroughly 
instructed. 

We believe that discipline should be kind and sympathetic, 
but always firm. 

We believe that the principles of Christianity are the basis of a 
noble character, and that the plastic period of youth is the best 
time for impressing those principles. 

It is our endeavor to conduct the school in accordance with 
these convictions. As to the measure of our success, we respect- 
fully refer to the present patrons of the school, whose names will 
be furnished on application. 

SMALL ROYS. 

The School has not always been so organized that it could 
be recommended for small boys. Recently there has been a change. 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 3 1 

It is now a home school, with facilities for the proper education and 
training of boys as young as eight years of age. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

The Regents reserve the right to suspend or dismiss any pupil 
whenever they believe that the interest of the school requires 
such action. Boys who exert a vicious influence will not be 
allowed to remain at the school. 

Suitable testimonials or references should accompany all appli- 
cations for admission. 

Leave of absence in term-time is not allowed, except in case 
of great urgency. Particular remembrance of this rule is requested 
of patrons. 

Parents are requested not to supply their sons with pocket 
money. A moderate sum for this purpose should be deposited with 
the Hector. 

All communications concerning the School should be addressed 
to H. N. Hills, Rector. 



GAMI5IER CATALOGUE. 



A PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR BOYS 



Founded by Rev. Alfred Blake, D. D. 



Rev. Albert B. Putnam, A. M., Rector. 
Thomas D. Suple'e, A. M., Head Master. 

Assistants : 
George E. Benedict, A. B. H. B. Clement. 



This school has been in successful operation for over thirty 
years, and is designed to furnish a pleasant and healthful home for 
boys, where a kind and constant supervision is exercised over 
their physical, moral and intellectual education. 

The studies are arranged to accommodate two classes of pupils. 

The Classical Course is intended to fit boys for admission to 
College ; the Commercial, to give an efficient preparation for the 
ordinary pursuits of life. 

Parents are requested to advise with the Rector as to the 
course of study to be pursued by their sons, and will be kept 
informed as to their progress by monthly reports and special 
communications, whenever the Rector shall deem the latter to be 
necessary. 

The discipline of the school is as nearly parental as possible. 
It is the earnest endeavor of the Rector to secure the aid of 
pupils in the government of themselves, thus forming the basis of a 
manly, independent character. The rules are few in number, but 
are firmly enforced. 

To guard against the admission of any boys of vicious habits, 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 33 



all applicants mu»t be well recommended to the Rector. Any boy 
found to be vicious or insubordinate, after becoming a member of 
the school, will be promptly dismissed. 

The grounds of the school are thirteen acres in extent, and are 
beautifully shaded with fruit, ornamental and forest trees. The 
Kokosing river is distant only a quarter of a mile, and affords fine 
advantages for boating, skating and bathing. The forests and 
fields in the neighborhood contain an abundance of small game, 
which, at proper times, and with the Rector's permission, the 
pupils are allowed to hunt. 

As an aid to the proper physical education of the pupils, a 
gymnasium has been fitted up, containing such apparatus as is 
best suited to develop the muscles with the least risk of injuring 
the health. The pupils are also encouraged to engage in all 
out-of-door sports and pastimes. 

Pupils are not allowed to receive or read any vicious or sensa- 
tional publications. The Rector will see that they are supplied 
with literature of a healthy and manly tone, and a constant effort 
will be made to develop an honest, truthful, Christian character. 

Each pupil is expected to bring with him a Bible, Prayer Book, 
three sheets, single (unless in the case of brothers who wish to 
sleep together), two pillow cases, six towels, six table napkins, 
a napkin ring, and an umbrella, all plainly marked. 

The number of pupils is limited to thirty. 

The school year consists of one session, beginning upon the 
second Wednesday of September, broken by a vacation of two 
weeks at Christmas, and twelve days at Easter, and closing about 
the 20th of June. 

EXPENSES. 

Boarding Pupils, .... $400 00 per year. 
French, Music, or Drawing, . . 50 00 per year. 
The expenses for boarding pupils include board, tuition, 
room, washing, mending, fuel and light. 

All bills must be paid in advance, one-half at the beginning of 
the school year, and one-half on the 1st of February. 

Parents are requested not to furnish their sons with pocket 
money, but upon agreement, the Rector will supply such moderate 
sums as may be needed. 

Further information will be furnished upon application being 
made to the Rector. 



34 GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



REQUISITES FOR ADMISSION. 



Any student applying for admission to the Freshman Class at 
the beginning of the Collegiate year, will be admitted without 
examination, provided he brings a certificate from the Principal of 
a High School of any city in Ohio, or from the Principal of any 
reputable Preparatory School or Academy, that he has thoroughly 
done all the work prescribed in our catalogue for admission to the 
Freshman Class, and provided that the Principal will also state 
that, in his opinion, the applicant is able to maintain a good 
position in his class, and that he is of good moral character and 
habits. 

Candidates for the Freshman Class are examined in the follow- 
ing studies : 

English — Grammar ; Reading ; Spelling, and Composition. 

Mathematics— Arithmetic ; Algebra, through radicals and 
quadratics ; five chapters of Tappan's Geometry. 

Latin— Grammar, including Prosody ; Arnold's Prose Compo- 
sition to Chapter X ; Caesar, four books ; Cicero, six orations ; 
Virgil, four books of the iEneid. 

The English method of pronunciation is preferred. 

Greek — Grammar, including Prosody and Composition ; 
Xenophon's Anabasis, three books ; Homer's Iliad, one book. 

Goodwin's Grammar is used as a manual. Some simple reader 
or companion book of exercises should be used in connection with 
the Grammar. 

German— Students who omit Greek are examined in Whitney's 
German Grammar and Whitney's German Reader. 

Geography— Ancient and Modern. 

In reading Caesar and Xenophon, there should be constant 
reference to the map. 

Mythology— A hand-book, such as Baird's Classical Manual, 
should be studied in connection with Virgil and Homer. A good 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 35 

classical dictionary and a dictionary of antiquities are necessary to 
classical students. 

Advanced Standing— Candidates for advanced standing 
are examined in the above studies, and in the studies that have 
been pursued by the class. 

Fair equivalents are received for any of the above named books, 
or for parts of them. The bcoks named serve to indicate the 
amount required. 

If a student is further advanced in some studies than in others, 
he may pursue the studies in which he is prepared. Opportunities 
are furnished such irregular students to make up their defective 
study. 

Candidates for admission must present testimonials of good 
moral character ; and, if they come from other colleges, certificates 
of dismission in good standing. 

. The regular examination for admission to College takes place 
on Tuesday preceding Commencement, beginning at 8:30 o'clock 
A. M. Another examination is held on the day before the opening 
of the Christmas Term, at the same hour. Students may be 
examined for an advanced standing at any time before the com- 
mencement of the second term of the Senior year. 



36 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



t 0f &tttft)- 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 


English— 




Composition. 


Lectures, Exercises in Class, and 




Essays. 


Rhetoric. 


Abbott's "How to Write Clearly." 


Declamation. 




German— 




Wilhelm Tell. 


Schiller. 


Minna von Barnhelm. 


Leasing. 


Ilistorische Skizzen. 


Schiller. 


Grammar. 


Whitney. 


Greek— 




Homer's Iliad. 


Owen. 


Xenophon's Memorabilia. 




Plato, selections. 


Tyler. 


Prose Composition. 


Arnold. 


Prosody. 


Anthon . 


Latin— 




Virgil's Eclogues and 




Georgics. 


Chase and Stuart. 


Livy. 


Chase and Stuart. 


Prose Composition. 


Arnold. 


Mathematics— 




Algebra. 


Wells. 


Geometry. 


Tappan. 


Natural Science— 




Botany. 


Gray. 


Religion— 




Sacred History. 




History— 




Ancient History throughout the year. 



GAMBIRR 


CATALOGUE. 37 


tStatr** 


of jHit$g* 


SOPHOMORE CLASS. 


English— 




Composition. 


Class Exercises, and Essays. 




Original Orations before the Col- 
lege. 


Ehetoric. 


Whately. 


French— 




Grammar. 




Tableaux de la Revolution 


Francaise, by 


Crane and Brun. 


German— 




Egmont. 


Goethe. 


Xathan der Weise. 


Lessing. 


Faust, Part I. 


Goethe. 


Header of German Literature, by Rosenstengel, in connection 

with Taylor. 


German Literature throug 
out the year, oue lesson 
week. 


h- 
a 
Taylor. 


Greek— 




Plato, selections. 


Tyler. 


Thucydides, Sicilian Expedi- 
tion. Frost. 


Demosthenes, de Corona. 


Chaplin. 


Prose Composition. 


Rust. 


Latin— 




Tusculan Disputations. 


Chase and Stuart. 


Horace's Odes. 


Chase and Stuart. 


Tacitus, Germania and 
Agricola. 


Chase and Stuart. 


Composition. 


Arnold. 


Mathematics— 




Trigonometry. 


Wells. 


Surveying. 


Lectures and Practice. 


Analytic Geometry. 


Bowser. 


Religion— 




Ecclesiastical History. 




History— 




Ancient History throughout the year. 



3« 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



> £\ : r 



r 



§4-4 * ^ 
. ¥111 



JUNIOE CLASS. 

English— 

Original Orations before the Col- 
lege. 
Greek— 

^Eschylus, selections. 
Sophicles, selections. 
French— 
Grammar. 

Translation, English into French. 
Selected Modern Plays. 

Corneille. 
Racine. 



Le Cid. 
Athalie. 

L4TIN— 



Mathematics- 



Natural Science— 



Philosophy- 



Relgion— 



Cicero de Officiis. 

Horace— Satires and Epistles. 

Calculus. 

Mechanics. 

Acoustics. 

Heat. 

Light. 

Electricity. 

Astronomy. 

Logic. 



Evidences of Christianity. 
History— 

Course of Reading in English and American History, with ex- 
amination thereon at the end of the year. Text books 
recommended are : Green's short History of the English 
People, and Doyle's History of the United States. 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



39 



m 



J: . 



SENIOR CLASS. 

English— 

Literature. 

Original Orations before the Col- 
lege. 
French— 

Le Misanthrope and L'Avare. Moliere. 



Le Barbier de Seville. 
Zadig. 
Hernani. 

French Literature. 
Translation and Dictation 
throughout the course. 
Natural Science— 



Philosophy- 



History 



Political Science- 



Religion— 



Beaumarchais. 
Voltaire. 
Victor Hugo. 
Saintsbury. 



Chemistry. 

Physiology. 

Geology. 

Mental. 

Moral. 

History of Philosophy. 

History of Civilization. 

Elementary Law. 
International Law. 
Constitutional Law. 
Political Economy. 



Evidences of Christianity. 
Throughout the Course, Lectures on the Holy Scriptures, and 
on the Articles of the Christian Faith as contained in the 
Apostle's Creed and the Book of Common Prayer. 



40 GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



LOCATION. 

Gambier is a village, situated in the central part of Ohio, and 
is noted for its beautiful scenery, and its healthful and invigorating 
climate. No better place could well be found for quiet study, or 
for moral and religious culture. There are no saloons in the place. 
Gambier is distant by rail two hours from Columbus, five hours 
from Cleveland, and six hours from Cincinnati. The station of the 
Cleveland, Akron and Columbus railroad is immediately in the 
rear of the College grounds. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 

The buildings are among the best in the United States. The 
Halls of the Literary Societies are unsurpassed. The College Park 
contains about a hundred acres, well shaded with maples, and with 
the grand old oaks of the native forest. To the east, the west and 
the south, it slopes most beautifully to the valley of the Kokosing. 

TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

The Commencement is held on the Thursday before the last 
day of June. For particular dates see calendar, page 21, 

ATTENDANCE AND EXAMINATIONS. 

Students not in their places at the opening of the Term must 
show by written statement from their parents or guardians that 
the absence was necessary. 

It has been thought best to abolish the system of hearing 
excuses for absences. When a student is necessarily absent from 
Gambier, and in cases of clear physical disability, known as such at 
the time by the Faculty, absences may be excused by special 
Faculty action. A student should not be held morally accountable 
for such absences, and they are not considered in estimating his 
attendance grade ; but in deciding the question whether or not a 
student should be examined at the end of the term, all absences 
are counted. The Dean keeps a record of all absences, and makes 
frequent reports to the Faculty. Regularity in the performance 
of all College duties is important for the welfare, not only of the 
individual student, but also of his class, and any student who per- 
sistently neglects these duties shall be required to leave College. 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 41 

It is deemed unnecessary to examine at the end of the term 
those students who are regular in their attendance upon their 
College duties, and who show by their class work that they are well 
qualified to proceed with the studies of the next term. 

Any student who fails to make a term grade of seventy-five in 
any study is examined in that study at the end of the term. 

Any student who is absent from more than one-tenth of the 
recitations in any study is examined in that study at the end of 
the term. 

Any student whose total number of absences from recitations 
and Chapel exercises exceeds forty-five during the Christmas term, 
or thirty-five during either of the shorter terms, is examined at 
the end of the term upon all the studies of that term. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP. 

Students are required to attend Morning Prayers in the College 
Chapel, also the public services on Sundays, and on the principal 
Holy Days of the Church. 

BIBLE LECTURE. 

A Thursday morning Lectureship has been established for the 
elucidation and enforcement of the great doctrines of the Christian 
religion, for the discussion of great moral questions, for meeting 
individual difficulties of belief, and making plain the harmony 
between God's Works and His Word. 

THE BEDELL LECTURESHIP. 

Through the liberality of Bishop and Mrs. Bedell, the interest 
of $5,000 has been devoted to the establishment of a course of 
lectures on the Evidences of Natural and Kevealed Religion, and 
the Relation of Science and Religion. The Lectures are delivered 
biennially on Founders' Day. 

MATRICULATION. 

A student is admitted to matriculation when he has sustained a 
satisfactory probation. Matriculation gives accredited membership 
to the Institution, and entitles the student to an honorable dismis- 
sion. For misconduct, he may be reduced to the condition of a 
Probationer. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The Faculty reserve the right to suspend, remove or expel any 
student, whenever they believe that the interests of the College 
require such action. 



4-2 GAMBIER CATALOGUE, 



DEGREES. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon all students 
of the regular course in good standing who are approved at the 
final examination of the Senior class. 

The degree of Bachelor of Philosophy is conferred upon those 
who have successfully pursued the study of Modern Languages 
instead of Greek, and who have sustained a satisfactory examina- 
tion upon all other studies of the regular course. 

The degree of Master of Arts is conferred on Bachelors of 
three years' standing, who have pursued a year's study in some 
branch of the Liberal Arts, under the direction of the College 
Faculty . For Bachelors graduated before 1883 the rule remains as 
heretofore published. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

The two Literary Societies, the Philomathesian and Nu Pi 
Kappi, have always been fostered by the College. The Society Halls 
are very commodious, and have been handsomely fitted up, occupy- 
ing the whole of the second and third stories of the central portion 
of Ascension Hall. All the students are expected to be active 
members. 

LIBRARIES. 

The students have access to the Libraries of the Theological 
Seminary and of Kenyon College. The aggregate number of 
volumes. in these Libraries is about 22,000, 

READING ROOMS. 

Two Beading Rooms have been fitted up by the members of 
the Philomathesian and Nu Pi Kappi Societies, where copies of 
the leading English and American periodicals and newspapers are 
kept on file. 

BOARDING AND LODGING. 

Rooms are provided in the College buildings in which all 
students must lodge, unless they obtain permission from the Presi- 
dent to room elsewhere. The College makes no special provision 
for board. This can be readily obtained in private families, or, at 
times, in clubs. 

EXPENSES. 

Each room is sufficiently large and convenient to accommodate 
two students. The rooms are provided with stoves, and are neatly 
painted and papered by the College. Students provide their own 
beds, furniture, light, books and stationery. Furniture can often 
be bought, as well as sold, at second hand, and the expense 
incurred by its use need not be great. 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 43 

The College charges are : For Tuition, $25 per term ; for Room 
Rent, $5 (at least) per term ; and for Incidentals, $10 per annum. 
A matriculation fee of $5 is charged to every student at his 
entrance. There are also some minor expenses, consisting of taxes 
voluntarily imposed by the students in their classes and literary 
societies, and the expenses of graduation. 

Every student must keep on deposit with the Treasurer $5 as 
security for damage. Any balance is returned to the student at 
the close of each year. 

When a student is absent for a term, and is afterwards, upon 
examination, allowed to go on with his class, tuition is charged for 
the time of his absence. Room rent is charged when a room is 
reserved for a student. 

Fuel is supplied by the agent of the College, and must be paid 
for in advance, at the same time with the bill for tuition. The 
charge is $6 per term for the first and second term, and $3 for the 
third term ; and twice these sums when a room is occupied by a 
single student. 

Board in private families costs from $3.50 to $4.00 per week. 
Clubs are sometimes formed, and the expense for board is thereby 
materially reduced. 

Students are not allowed to board themselves in their rooms, 
as this practice has been found to be perilous to health. 

The following estimate may be given of the annual expenses, 
not including expenses in vacation : 

Tuition, ..... 

Room Rent, .... 

Incidentals, 

Fuel, ..... 

Board, .... 

Washing, .... 

Lights, .... 

Total, .... 

Other incidental expenses, such as books and stationery, 
furniture, expenses in societies, traveling expenses, etc., vary 
according to circumstances, and the character and habits of the 
individual student. 

The College bill must be paid in advance, according to the 
following rule of the trustees : 

'* All students shall be required to pay their regular term bills 
in advance. The Treasurer's receipt shall be required by the 
President before he shall sign a certificate of matriculation, or, 
after the first term, before the student shall attend recitations." 





$75 


$15 to 


50 




10 


15 to 


30 


95 to 152 


15 to 


25 


5 to 


8 


$230 to $350 



44 GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



ASSISTANCE. 

Tuition fees are remitted to sons of clergymen. A few scholar- 
ships are available for students of the highest character and ability. 

THE HENRY B. CURTIS SCHOLARSHIPS IN KENYON COLLEGE. 

Hon. Henry B. Curtis, LL. D., has granted to the Trustees of 
Kenyon College a fund for the aid of meritorious students by 
loans of money at a low rate of interest. The interest is intended 
to meet only the risk of life, and is to be not greater than the 
average rate of life insurance. 

Application for the benefit of a Henry B. Curtis scholarship 
must be addressed to the Secretary of the College Faculty, 
Gambier, O., and must state the applicant's name, residence, age, 
his father's name, and the amount asked for. The application is 
to be understood as confidential with the Faculty. In making the 
selection, the Faculty will consider all evidence that may be obtained 
as to the applicant's character, ability and merit, including his 
examinations in school and college, and his record for punctuality 
and other good conduct, the best evidence being the Faculty's 
personal acquaintance with the applicant. The appropriations will 
be made for only one year at a time. The scholarship is intended 
to help the student, but not to cover all his expenses. The max- 
imum for one student for one year will be one hundred and fifty 
dollars, but for a student's first year in college, seventy-five dollars. 
The sum appropriated will be paid in equal parts, one at the 
beginning of each college term. Upon each payment the student 
will give his promissory note for the repayment in five years 
from date, with interest at the rate of one and one-half per centum 
per annum. 



GAMBIKR CATALOGUE. 45 



Hpotogtrail jfrtmttatt}. 



JEHOVAH JIREH 



3EG-T7LATI02TS. 



AD3IISSION. 

Any candidate for orders in the Protestant Episcopal Church 
in the United States may be received as a student in the Seminary; 
and any other person who may give sufficient evidence of a fair 
moral and religious character. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Candidates for admission to the Degree of iiachelor in Divinity 
who are not Bachelors of Arts must pass a satisfactory examina- 
tion in the Greek of the New Testament, and give evidence of 
sufficient acquaintance with the Latin language and the general 
principles of Natural, Intellectual and Moral Philosophy, and of 
Rhetoric. They will also he required to read an original compo- 
sition. 

A public examination of each class is held previous to the 
Annual Commencement ; and certificates are awarded to those who, 
on the final examination, are found to have successfully pursued 
the full course of study. 

MATRICULATION. 

Every student, on being admitted to full standing, must 
subscribe the following declaration in the Matriculation Book of 
the Seminary : 

" We. the subscribers, Students of the Theological Seminary of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, in the Diocese of Ohio, do solemnly promise, with reliance 
on Divine Grace, that we will faithfully obey the laws and pursue the studies 
thereof, endeavor to promote the reputation and interests of the Seminary, and 
make daily efforts, by pious reading, self examination, and secret prayer, to 
cultivate all religious and moral dispositions and habits, and grow in those 
graces which should characterize the Christian and the Minister of the Cross." 

The day of matriculation is determined each year by the con- 
venience of the Bishop, who is President of the Seminary. 

SEMINARY YEAR. 

The Seminary year extends from the first Thursday in October 
to the last Thursday in June. It is divided into three terms, as 
follows : 

Christmas Term.— From first Thursday in October until Christ- 
mas Day. 

Easter Term.— From New Year's day until Passion Week. 

Trinity Term.— From Easter Monday until Commencement. 

During the Christmas Recess students have leave of absence. 

During Passion Week Recess only Recitations are suspended 

Every student is expected to be present on the first day of the 
term. 



4 6 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



The Course of Study embraces nine departments, and extends 
through three years, as follows : 

I. HEBREW LANGUAGE. 

Text Books. 

Dentsch's Hebrew Grammar. Gesenius' Hebrew and English Lexicon. 

Gesenius' Hebrew Grammar and Sep- Hebrew Bible (Hahn). 
tuagint. 

II. BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND INTERPRETATION. 

Text Books. References. 

Tischcndorf's Greek New Testament. Alford's Greek New Testament. 
Westcott's Introduction (Gospels). Septuagint. 

Robinson's Lexicon, New Testament. Andrews' Life of Our Lord. 
Home's Introduction (Ayre&Tregelles). Smith's Dictionary of the Bible. 
Robinson's Harmony. Ellicott's Commentaries. 

Wordsworth's Commentary. 

Bible Commentary (Speakers). 

Conybeare and Howson's St. Paul. 

Ge ike's Life of Christ. 

III. APOLOGETICS. 

Text Books. References. 

Mcllvaine's Evidences. 

Leslie on Deism. 

Rawlinson's Historical Evidences. 

Aids to Faith. 



Butler's Analogy. 

Home's Introduction (Evidences). 

Christlieb's Modern Doubt and Chris 

tian Belief. 
Paley's Evidences. 

I\ 

Text Books. 



Pearson on the Creed. 
Browne on the Articles. 
Magee on the Atonement. 
Craik's Divine Life. 
Bull's Fidei Nicenpe. 



Hurd on Prophecy. 

SYSTEMATIC DIVINITY. 

References. 

The Homilies. 

Harmonica Apostolica. 

Mcllvaine's Righteousness by Faith. 

Burnet on the Articles. 

Hardwick's History of the 39 Articles. 

Wall on Baptism. 

Trevor on the Eucharist. 

McCosh on Divine Government. 

Liddon on the Divinity of Christ. 

Dwight's Theology. 

Jones on the Trinity. 





GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 


47 


V. BIBLICAL AND ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 




Text Books. References. 




Smith's Histories. Robertson's Ecclesiastical History. 




Butler's Ecclesiastical History. Mosheim's Ecclesiastical History. 




Hardwick on the Middle Age. Newman's Arians of the 4th Century. 




Hardwick on the Reformation. Neander's Church History. 




Perry's History of the Church of Eng- 




land. Prideaux's Connection. 




White's History of the American 




Church. Smith's Chronological Tables. 




Burnet on the Reformation. 




Smith's Ancient History of the East. 




Rawlinson's Ancient History. 




Haganbach's History of Doctrine. 




VI. CHURCH POLITY AND LITURGICS. 




Text Books. References. 




Hooker's Ecclesiastical Polity. Bingham's Antiquities. 




Onderdonk on Episcopacy. Genesis of the Church. 




Potter on Church Government. Mcllvaine's Holy Catholic Church. 




Littledale's Reasons. Bedell's Episcopacy, Fact and Law. 




Proctor on Common Prayer. Blakeney. 




Brownell on Common Prayer. Freeman. 




Digest of the Canons. Hoffman on the Law of the Church. 




Hoffman on Ritual Law. 




Lightfoot on the Christian Ministry. 




VII. PASTORAL THEOLOGY. 




Text Books. References. 




The Pastor (Bedell). Bishop Oxford's Ordination Address. 




Bridges on Christian Ministry. Meade's Lectures. 




Oxenden's Pastoral Office. Tyng on Sunday School. 




Mcllvaine on Preaching Christ. 




VIII. SACRED RHETORIC. 




Text Books. References. 




Broadus on the Preparation and Shedd's Homiletics. 




Delivery of Sermons. Brooks' Lectures on Preaching. 




Storrs on Extemporaneous Preaching. Moore's Thoughts on Preaching. 




Gresley on Preaching. Alexander's Thoughts on Preaching. 




Kidd on Elocution. Theremin's Eloquence a Virtue. 




IX. CHRISTIAN MISSIONS. 




Text Books. References. 




Hardwick's Christ and Other Masters. Dennison's History of Foreign Missions. 


McLear's Missions of the Middle Ages. Anderson's Colonial Missions. 




From Pole to Pole. 





48 GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



€!ctS80£0 



Note.— Every student must belong to one of the classes named below, and 
pursue all the studies of his class, unless he receives a dispensation from his 
Bishop. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

I. Hebrew Language. 

Deutsch's Hebrew Grammar and Chrestomathy. 

II. Biblical Literature and Interpretation. 

Introduction to the Scriptures. New Testament 
Interpretation. 

III. Apologetics. 

Evidences of Christianity. 
V. Ecclesiastical History. 
Sacred History. 

VIII. Sacred Rhetoric. 

Principles of Composition and Reading. Preparation 
of Skeletons of Sermons. 

IX. Christian Missions. 

Apostolic Missions and those of the Early Church. 

MIDDLE CLASS. 

I. Hebrew Language. 

Bible and Gesenius' Hebrew Grammar and Septuagint. 

II. Biblical Literature and Interpretation. 

New Testament Interpretation. 

IV. Systematic Divinity. 

Didactic and Polemic. 

V. Ecclesiastical History. 

Ancient and Mediaeval. 

VIII. Sacred Rhetoric. 

Preparation and Delivery of Sermons. Practice in 
Reading Services and Scriptures. 

IX. Christian Missions. 

Missions of the Middle Ages. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

I. Hebrew. 

Studies of the Middle Class Continued. 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 49 



II. Biblical Literature and Interpretation. 
Old Testament Interpretation. 

IV. Systematic Divinity. 

Didactic, Polemic and Ethical. 

V. Ecclesiastical History. 

Modern. 

VI. Church Polity and Liturgics. 

Church Government. 

Liturgy and Usages of the Protestant Episcopal 

Church. 
Constitutions and Canons. 

VII. Pastoral Theology. 

Lectures. Criticism of Sermons. 
IX. Christian Missions. 

Revival of Missions after the Reformation, and since 
the Middle of the 18th Century. 

ALL THE CLASSES. 

Rhetorical Exercises. 



lectures. 

Lectures are given by the Professors upon all the subjects of the 
course. 

A course of Lectures is given on Science in its connection with 
Natural Theology by the Bowler Professor in Kenyon College. 

Students are allowed to attend gratuitously any recitations or 
lectures in Kenyon College, provided they do not interfere with the 
appropriate duties of the Seminary. 

LAWS. 

Theological students are not expected to need discipline. A 
few laws exist tending to mutual convenience. Every student is 
expected to obtain leave before being absent from any recitation. 

EXPENSES. 

No charge is made for instruction, room rent, permanent fur- 
niture, or use of Library. Text books and movable furniture (such 
as bedding, towels, etc.,) are to be provided by the students. 

Aid will be given to properly qualified students, by scholar- 
ships, or by the Joint Education Committee of the Dioceses of 
Ohio and Southern Ohio. 



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50 k 0* 



— 



GAMBIER CATALOGUE. 



Board (38 weeks) costs from §114 to $133; Fuel, from $15 to 
$20 ; Washing, from $15 to $20 ; Lights, from $3 to $5 ; Total, from 
$147 to $178. 

LIBRARY. 

The Library of the Theological Seminary contains about seven 
thousand volumes. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

Students are expected to attend Daily Morning Prayers at the 
Church of the Holy Spirit. They are appointed in turn to read the 
lesson for the day. Evening Prayers are held in the Seminary 
Chapel. A Devotional Meeting, conducted by members of the 
Faculty, is held weekly. One hour each week is devoted to Bible 
Class studies in the English Bible by all the students. 

BISHOP AUER MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Objects.— Inquiry respecting Missions— Diocesan, Domestic 
and Foreign ; to establish Sunday Schools, and to employ other 
means of exerting a religious influence in the vicinity of Gambier. 

MISSIONARY DUTY. 

Members of the Senior Class are licensed as Lay Readers, and 
act under the direction of the Bishop. 

Members of the Middle and Junior Classes act a? Lay Mission- 
aries in connection with the Bishop Auer Missionary Society, and 
under the advice of the Pastor of Harcourt Parish. 

READING ROOM. 

A Reading Room has been established in Bexley Hall, to 
which the students have free access, and which is furnished with 
some of the principal religious periodicals. 

LOCATION. 

Gambier is about the center of Ohio, fifty miles northeast of 
Columbus, on the Cleveland, Akron and Columbus R. R., which 
connects with the A. and G. W. R. R. at Akron, and with the P., 
Ft. W. and C. R. R. at Orrville, and with the Lake Erie division 
of the B. and O. R. R. at Mt. Vernon. The distance from the 
Eastern cities is 20 to 30 hours ; from Toronto, 20 ; from Chicago, 
15 ; and from St. Louis, 20. The fare is about 60 cents per hour. 

Applicants for admission will address the Right Rev. G. T. 
Bedell, D. D., President, or the Rev. Fleming James, D. D., 
Secretary of the Faculty, Gambier, Ohio. 



Republican J^rint, Mt. Vernon, O. 



3 0112 105809138